Skip to main contentSkip to main content
You are the owner of this article.
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
Frederick Hopkins seeks $1.6 billion from people suing him over Oct. 3, 2018, shooting
0 Comments

Frederick Hopkins seeks $1.6 billion from people suing him over Oct. 3, 2018, shooting

  • 0
{{featured_button_text}}

FLORENCE, S.C. – The man accused of killing two police officers and wounding five more on Oct. 3, 2018, seeks $1.6 billion in damages from four of the people who filed civil suits against him.

Frederick Hopkins recently filed responses to four of the five lawsuits filed against him.

Hopkins responded to suits by Katie Godwin, the mother of Florence County sheriff’s investigator Farrah Turner, Allison Carraway, the window of Florence police Sgt. Terrence Carraway, Florence County Sheriff’s Deputy Arie Davis and Florence police officer Brian Hart. He has not yet responded to the suit filed by Scott Williamson.

Each of the answers is hand-written on what appears to be notebook paper or blank sheets of paper. At several points in each of his answers, counterclaims and cross-claims, Hopkins words go off the page to the right or go below the page on the bottom.

Hopkins filed his response to Carraway’s suit on Nov. 15.

In this answer, Hopkins denies every allegation made in the complaint including that he is a citizen and resident of Florence County, that the events of Oct. 3, 2018, happened in Florence County and that Terrence Carraway drove to the Hopkins’ home in his capacity as a police officer.

Two paragraphs later, he admits that he’s a citizen and resident of Florence County.

Hopkins also calls the suit a legal farce of unsubstantiated and unverified allegations designed to extort financial resources from him that he earned through hard work and years of professional development.

He alleges that Carraway should be looking elsewhere for relief because the computer program that the sheriff’s office used showed that Hopkins was no threat when it should have predicted a hostile reaction.

Hopkins also argues that the he acted within his constitutional and statutory rights including the castle doctrine, that the claims against the trust that owns the family home should be dismissed because it isn’t a legal entity and that he has no money to pay anyone.

He also says that he has suffered extreme pain, discomfort and and disabling conditions attributable to Terrence Carraway’s actions.

Hopkins says in the next part of the paragraph that he had bruised or slightly fractured ribs, bruised kidneys and a loss of teeth after a “desperate but ultimately successful attempt” to bring him out of a coma induced by Carraway’s associates who played soccer with his head while he was standing his ground.

He then makes a crossclaim against Allison Carraway for these injuries and asks for $25 million in damages.

Hopkins also makes a “cross-claim” against Carraway and her attorney, John Guerry, alleging that the firm did not investigate the allegations made by Carraway. He asks for $300 million in damages.

He calls Guerry an ambulance chaser while making the allegation.

Hopkins filed a response to the suit filed by Hart on Nov. 9.

In his response, Hopkins admits that he’s a citizen and resident of Florence County, that the events of Oct. 3, 2018, happened in Florence County and that Hart, in his official capacity as a Florence police officer, drove to the home to investigate alleged criminal sexual conduct by Seth.

Hopkins then denies that he fired on officers, exchanging gunfire for two hours with them, that he killed two police officers and injured five more, that he has been charged with two counts of murder and five counts of attempted murder and that Hart suffered injuries.

He then says that he is required to make no response for allegations made against other defendants but denies the allegations anyway.

Hopkins then asks for Hart’s complaint to be dismissed, arguing that Hart’s negligence exceeds his own, that the police response violated state law because there were no mutual aid agreements, that his claims are barred by the castle doctrine, that Hart’s claims against the trust that owns the family home should dismissed because the trust isn’t a legal entity, and that Hart didn’t take steps to mitigate his injuries.

He then makes a counterclaim alleging that he suffered injuries and that the family home was heavily damaged. Hopkins asks for $150 million in damages.

Hopkins then alleges that Hart’s lawyers, Jeffrey Buncher and John Guerry, didn’t investigate Hart’s claims and as a result violated their oaths and the South Carolina Rules of Professional Responsibility. He asks for $500 million in damages.

Hopkins filed a response to the suit filed by Davis on Oct. 28.

He first argues that the suit should be dismissed because Davis’ attorney, Patrick Sharpe, included a claim of wrongful death in addition to allegations of negligence and gross negligence when Davis remains alive.

Hopkins quotes Omar Khayyam, a Persian – Hopkins calls him Arabian – poet and scientist, as he argues that all of the claims should be dismissed.

He then makes a counterclaim alleging that Davis with the assistance of her attorney and his law firm to abuse the legal process to extort, damage, injure and intimidate all the defendants. Hopkins asks for $50 million in damages.

Hopkins makes a cross-claim against Davis and Sharpe seeking $300 million in damages because he says the suit makes him fear for his life and the lives of his children.

He calls Sharpe “an insipidly incompetent barrister,” and alleges that the complaint was made to “extort, terrorize, defame, intimidate” the defendants in the suit. Hopkins continues saying the complaint is an attempt to obtain the “proverbial pot-o-gold” that is “muchly sought by ambulance-chasers and their greedy and feckless clientele, with a rapacious hunger for filthy [lucre] lucher.”

Hopkins filed his response to the lawsuit filed by Godwin on Oct. 14.

In his response to that suit, Hopkins denies every allegation made by Godwin in the complaint twice and specifically denies that Turner drove to Hopkins’ home in the Vintage Place subdivision in her official capacity as a sheriff’s investigator.

Hopkins makes a counterclaim arguing that Godwin should sue the Florence County Sheriff’s Office because of mistakes made in the application for a search warrant for his son, Seth, and the tactics used by police on Oct. 3, 2018. He then asks for damages for the failure of the law firm to do its due dilligence in amounts of $25 million from Godwin and $50 million for her law firm.

He also makes a “cross-claim” against Godwin’s attorney, Jerry Meehan Jr., and his law firm, alleging many of the same things in the counterclaim but asking for $200 million and all costs of the lawsuit.

0 Comments

Get local news delivered to your inbox!

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

WILMINGTON, N.C. -- Confidence remains low at to how much ice the Pee Dee will get and what the impact of that ice will be, but the forecast contains no mystery as to whether or not it will happen at all.

Recommended for you

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News

News Alert